Binary Cocoa Drops the Bass

Collider has a couple different game modes within it that I’ve been writing music for over the past year. Today I completed another track for a game mode called ‘Sumo’ that involves pushing large objects with your ship. I sat down with my keyboard and tried to imagine music that would go along with a vision of two fat people running at each other in a dance off fashion. This is what I came up with:

Collider is out on itch.io at the moment and you can get it in a prerelease form! We’re hoping people will notify us if there are any major problems before we go ahead and put it on Steam and Humble Bundle.

In other news Stephen completed a short animation sequence in his spare time while Joseph was insanely busy. It only took him half a year and 185 drawings to finish! Have a laugh watching it:

Binary Cocoa Turns the Lights On

Vikings is the first game that we have coded a lighting engine for. We have used shaders before but this task went above and beyond and nearly crashed our brains. We went through many jars of bean dip before we were able to figure it out. Our friend Braxton Huggins put his brain to the grindstone and churned out the maths. Joseph gave him much needed help and they were able to make something that looks like this:

Screen Shot 2015-08-17 at 5.16.53 PM

Excellent!

If you look closely you can see the viking ship at the bottom with it’s own light source that moves with it as it climbs through the cave. Having this lighting engine opens up several possibilities for us such as having lit up projectiles, enemies, heroes and even sheep! We have already implemented extinguishable objects which adds to the overall eerie atmosphere within the game. We are more than open to sharing our lighting code if anyone wishes.

We’re all still working full time jobs (except Stephen who has triumphantly returned to Idaho from Virginia) and it doesn’t leave us an enormous amount of time to work unfortunately, but we put in hours when we can. We hope to port the bits of reusable code from the previous vikings build and get it working on mobile phones soon! Keep your eyes peeled for possible testing opportunities and other exciting news.

Check back next week!

Binary Cocoa Pushes Ahead on Collider

Exciting times are directly ahead for Binary Cocoa with their Steam release of Collider! The game is 99% percent complete, and as many developers know that last 1% percent is the hardest part to complete. We are squashing the bugs and introducing new ones in the process. We have perfected the two game modes we have and are contemplating adding a third…but we won’t have you all holding your breathe for it.

Our release plan is to put the game up on itch.io for a prerelease and then move on to Steam and Humble Bundle. We hope you all will enjoy it as much as we’ve had fun testing it! It’s a blast to play with two or more players. Once you get eight players in it gets super chaotic. Use it to make new friends or enemies if you wish!

Vikings has been creeping along smoothly as well. Our friend Braxton Huggins implement a lighting system for us that will light up the boat, flames and enemies while the rest of the cave remains shrouded in darkness. It’s starting to look really eerie. Awesome!

Check back for more updates soon!

How to Animate Sprites in Tiled

When I first started animating for Binary Cocoa I would usually draw my sprites and give them to Joseph hoping they would turn out alright. Sometimes I would check them in After Effects but the process was kinda tedious so I used a trial and error approach. Thankfully the results weren’t horrible all the time, but we might have avoided so many disasters if I just had a simple animation function. Thankfully, Tiled came with one! Here is how I use it:

1. Assemble your sprite sheet so that each sprite is the same width and height. Here is a sprite sheet I created for Hexapod Defense Force:

spritesheet

2. Drop your sprite sheet into Tiled and make sure you enter in the dimensions for one tile. You will see your sprite sheet on the left side of the program and it will divided for you.

3. Select View and Tile Animation Editor. You’ll see your sprite sheet in the middle of the editor. Double click your sprites in the order you wish to have them animate.It’ll show you a preview of your animation in the bottom left corner:

Screen Shot 2015-08-03 at 4.12.52 PM

4. Click close and watch your animation! Make some adjustments as it needs it. Hopefully you’ll find that your animation skills benefit from you have a program that lets you easily check your animations. The initial measuring of sprites can be a little cumbersome to the uninitiated but if you can wrangle that aspect you’ll be soon be flying.

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Check back here weekly for Binary Cocoa updates and game development tips!